A modification to animal welfare and management went into effect on June 1. The pet sellers in Japan should compel to implant electronic microchips in dogs and cats to prevent pet abandonment and make it easier to locate owners in emergencies.

The chip is cylindrical and is 2 mm in diameter and 10 mm in length. A syringe-like tool is typically used to implant it in dogs and cats close to their necks.

The chip has a 15-digit ID that can be read by specialized equipment and cross-referenced with a database that the Environment Ministry will keep to determine the owner’s details. These microchips are implanted by veterinarians. The price ranges from 3,000 to 10,000 yen ($23.18).

The updated regulation requires breeders, pet stores, and other dealers to implant the chips in pups, kittens, and adult dogs and cats for breeding to improve the breeding environment.

The law also mandates the owners to register their name, address, and phone number, along with their pet’s data, such as breed and birthday, on the government’s database. Within 30 days after purchasing a puppy or kitten from a pet store, customers are required to register their details as the owner.

The fee for signing up online is 300 yen.

However, anyone in the public who purchased a pet but did not register it will not face any consequences.

Since dealers are required to implant microchips in hundreds of thousands of puppies and kittens at roughly 8 weeks old, some people are worried about health hazards including the pet shedding the chip or having it shift around in the animal’s body.

Some claim that if people don’ register their details as an owner when they buy the pet, the system won’t work.

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