For the first time in years, Cienna walked, her face beaming with joy.

Her service dog Piper, who started actually bouncing with pleasure, seemed to be even more overjoyed.

Cienna, a disabled person who asked that her last name not be revealed, typically uses a wheelchair. Cienna constantly has Piper by her side, ready to assist in managing her ongoing medical concerns. He has received training in the recognition and notification of low blood sugar, migraines, mast cell reactions, and more. Additionally, he assists with mobility aid by pushing buttons for the disabled, picking up objects, and closing doors.

Cienna finally had the strength to take a few steps after receiving a new treatment. Although Piper is taught to control his excitement, he was unable to do so when he first saw Cienna walking.

It was really emotional for us both!

Here is a video showing Piper’s response:

 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Cienna, Piper, & Opie (@chronicallypersevering)

When not working, Piper enjoys everything involving water. He has been observed jumping from boats, entering showers, playing in hoses, chasing sprinklers, and even boogie boarding in the ocean.

Cienna’s life has been saved by Piper more times than she and her trainer from Michigan Service Dogs LLC can recall.

“He is continually learning new techniques to lessen my ever-changing impairment,” Cienna added. “He knows how to work next to any mobility equipment.” He is my biggest supporter and never fails to make me laugh. Without him and his efforts to save lives, I wouldn’t be here right now.

Cienna is incredibly grateful to have a service dog who can cuddle with her through her darkest periods and help her celebrate her biggest victories. Piper is content to be with Cienna no matter where they are or what they are doing, but Cienna knows he must be anticipating what this new treatment might mean for their future.

We used to love going to the beach, boogie boarding, and hiking. “I know he knows it’s hard for me to do those things,” Cienna remarked. “I believe that at least some of him knew that by taking just these few steps, we would have far easier access to those things.”

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